What you won’t see/ painful handshakes 

This past Sunday I preached at my home church. When I volunteered to do it two weeks ago, it seemed like a good idea. I had not considered the impact post-radiation issues would have on my ability to focus on study and writing or what would be involved I  preparing for the service itself.

What people didn’t see at church was the seeping mess I had to clean off my underarm area before I could even consider getting dressed, or the hassle of coming up with a top to wear that was appropriate and was least likely to show seepage or staining that I knew would be continuing throughout the service. There was cream to apply to the non-open areas when the burning is making the skin hot and super dry as well as medicated cream for the open area. In order to wear a top at all the last area needed to be covered with a non-adherent dressing. There was no way to secure this as the skin around was also damaged. This along with Advil and Tylenol and I was ready to go.

After service it is traditional for the person who preached to stand at the back of the church to meet and chat with those in attendance. I love this part of the morning! What I hadn’t thought of, and hopefully people didn’t notice was that a nice firm handshake turned out to be quite painful. 

As of today it has been a week since I finished radiation which sounds like a week past the struggle, but that is far from the truth! By Saturday I was at my wits end as to what was the best thing to do for wound care. Was it better to leave it open to the air (which meant no clothing and my arm up in the air like a wing or something) or should I try to find a way of covering it, and with what? Tom and I have been to almost every pharmacy in Fredericton trying to find the items that had been suggested to us for skin care. Most places didn’t have what we needed, some didn’t even know what we were talking about. How did the hospital think I was supposed to do this on my own?

On Monday Inlucked out and got in to see my family doctor and she immediately set me up with an appointment with a wound care nurse. When I finally got in to see her yesterday she explained that the reason for the level of pain where my skin has broken open is that it exposed the layer with all the nerve endings. Rah!

I showed her the directions I had been given and she was surprised at what they thought people could handle on their own. Then she cleaned it up and put a dressing on it that is pretty similar to what I had for the mastectomy. It needed to be so large to keep the whole area away from friction as well as having healthy skin on which to anchor it. The relief from this was awesome! Not only that, but the relief from the pressure to go it alone was significant. The dressings can stay on up to three days and I can go to the clinic for changes. I am not looking forward to the tape removal, she warned me to take stronger pain mess for that, but overall things ar better.

Some other things people in my cancer circles have mentioned that people don’t see include; 

  • the amount of energy they expend to get out
  • the fact that, while they may seem perky for the duration of an event, it may be the only time they are active for the whole day
  • some people feel their illness is somehow dismissed when people say how good they look (I haven’t minded this at all so far, keep the compliments coming)
  • the level of their fatigue

I have put links to two pictures below. I didn’t put them in the post itself because you may not want to see 
The first is of my skin before I went for help, it had progressed. https://www.flickr.com/gp/70909221@N02/zj56Vr

The bandaging from the wound clinic. https://www.flickr.com/gp/70909221@N02/4E002P

That Ubiquitous Pink Ribbon

Capture

Ah, the pink ribbon. The symbol of breast cancer as a sign of support and fundraising. It is everywhere and on everything from clothing to tools, chairs, phone covers, memory sticks, vacuum cleaners, car batteries, watches, jewelry, dog leashes, and even tire wheel rim valve stem caps. I have long supported breast cancer research to some extent, but not usually by buying pink ribbon things. I questioned, and still question, whether it was more useful to buy a cute shirt with a pink ribbon thus giving a portion of the cost to the foundations, or whether to just give the whole cost of the cute shirt and stick with the clothes I already own. 

I think we all have some sort of reaction when we see these bright loops of ribbon, or their facsimiles, whether we smile ; because they are pretty, because treatments have advanced so far, or because we know someone who has survived; or if our hearts sink as we think of friends or family members who are suffering or have died from the disease. 

My reaction has changed now, not surprisingly. I am actually quite torn. My initial reaction seems a bit visceral, as if I’ve been punched or something, especially if I see them somewhere I’m not expecting like on a sign as I’m driving somewhere. I understand that it is meant as a sign of hope, a sign of strength, a symbol of survival and those are all good and much as I previously reacted. Now I am reluctant to buy anything with the pink ribbon as if it has now become an identifier or some sort of team logo that has been forced upon me.

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think anyone is forcing anything on me. It is the disease that has forced itself into my life. I realize that lots of people who do not have breast cancer like to show their support by buying, using, and wearing pink ribbon items and there is no reason why anyone who doesn’t know me, or doesn’t read my blog, would bother to think, “Ooh, look, she is wearing a pink ribbon. She must have breast cancer!” any more than I ever have when I have seen people in the pink. 

Yes, these are the weird things I think about. Maybe after this round of active treatment is done I will feel more comfortable with the ribbon. In the meantime, stay tuned for the next navel-gazing ramble.

If you are interested in pink ribbon items that are reputable and monies go to the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation check out this link.