Making the mould/ marking for radiation

If you remember, I earlier wrote about my marking appointment for breast radiation when I thought a body mould was going to be made and it turned out that they just used a support frame with measured placements for consistent positioning.

Last week I had an appointment for marking for radiation on my rib. Gone was the frame, and instead the bed was covered by a sort of cushion with a nylon cover. It was a bit like a semi-stuffed bean bag. Once they had me in the position they needed they sucked the air out of the bag and it gathered more closely around me and became rigid. It is now a mould of my body which I will lie in for treatments.

The best part of this is that when my treatments are over, they will let air back in, clean the surfaces, and hang it up to wait for the next patient. Brilliant, reusing the mould rather than breaking it!

Today I become a rebel!

I am sitting at the Saint John Regional Hospital right now, killing time before my appointment for marking and prep for radiation therapy. I will be joining the tattoo crowd!

Along with the tattoo they will be making a body mould which will ensure that my body is in the exact same position for each of my 25 treatments. I’m quite curious about the process for this.

My appointment is in ten minutes, I’ll fill you in when we are done.

OK, so it has been a few days since I wrote that intro. All went very well and I now have four tiny tattoo dots. My daughter said freckles and that is pretty much what they look like. It was a very interesting process.

When I first got there I had a form to fill out and then I had my picture taken for an ID. Next was changing into a lovely hospital gown, high fashion for sure.

The marking etc took place in a CT scan room and began with appologies about the cold. The CT scanner gets very hot when it spins and needs a cold room to avoid overheating. Two nurses, a student nurse and a tech did everything and made me as comfortable as possible through the process.

There were green laser lines in a T across the room which I assume guided them in positioning me. The bed for the scan had an odd looking apparatus with a metal base with a bump around halfway up, and a series of red padded arms at the top. It turns out they don’t make a mould, at least not for irradiating the chest. Each part of the apparatus was adjustable, and, like an optometrist’s set up, each minute change they made could be recorded in a series of letters and numbers. This allowed them to get me in the position they needed and be sure that each time I go they will be set precisely the same.

It all took quite a while. They got me to lie down and adjusted my height by moving the bump to show where my bum needed to be. Then there was changing the arm holders so that, with both arms above my head, I would fit in the machine and put the right side of my chest in the necessary position.

Once that was done, they put a wire tape along my scar, and used marker to make dots on my sides and on my chest. These were temporary markings for aligning the scan. Then they put a sort of jell pad, they call it a bolus, over the area for radiation. Apparently, this pad acts as a layer of tissue.The radiation doesn’t reach full power right at the surface, so this acts like extra layers of skin so that they can get near the surface most effectively. This was positioned very carefully and then taped in place, checked, adjusted, and retaped.

When all this was done, I had a CT scan which they will use to plan the treatment. After they knew that the marker spots were definitely in the correct spots they cleaned the areas, dropped on some ink, and with a pin made one poke in, wiggled it a bit, and poof I had a tattoo! In the end, I had four, and it really didn’t hurt even as much as a blood test or an IV.

I am feeling pretty good about the treatments overall. I am not thrilled to need them, and a bit worried about how my skin will react. I do sunburn quite quickly. We will see how it goes. I have the cream they recommended and if that doesn’t work there are things they can prescribe. With the prayers of many people, and mine, things have gone well thus far and I know things will work out.